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Sensation and Perception

Page history last edited by Xin Zhao, Graduate Student Assistant 8 years, 10 months ago

 

Stephen Macknik (2010). Sleights of Mind: What the Neuroscience of Magic Reavelas about Our Everyday Deceptions.


Magic tricks fool us because humans have hardwired processes of attention and awareness that are hackable—a good magician uses your mind's own intrinsic properties against you in a form of mental jujitsu.


Review by Laura Sanders, Science News: Click Here

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Life, on the Line: A Chef's Story of Chasing Greatness, Facing Death, and ...‎

Life, on the Line: A Chef's Story of Chasing Greatness, Facing Death, and ... Grant Achatz, Nick Kokonas - 2011 - Biography & Autobiography - Limited preview
An award-winning chef and owner of Alinea restaurant describes how the author lost his sense of taste to cancer, a setback that prompted him to discover alternate cooking methods and create his celebrated progressive cuisine.
 

The Mind's Eye‎

The Mind's Eye Oliver Sacks - 2010 - No preview available
 

Through a Dog's Eyes‎

Through a Dog's Eyes Jennifer Arnold - 2010 - Pets - Limited preview
The founder of Canine Assistants, a nonprofit service-dog trainer and provider, outlines her unique training method, which is based on teaching dogs to make choices--as opposed to following commands--through kindness and encouragement rather than ...
 

Sleights of Mind: What the Neuroscience of Magic Reveals about Our Everyday ...‎

Sleights of Mind: What the Neuroscience of Magic Reveals about Our Everyday ... Stephen Macknick, Susana Martinez-Conde, Sandra Blakeslee - 2010 - No preview available
 

Rebuilt: My Journey Back to the Hearing World‎

Rebuilt: My Journey Back to the Hearing World Michael Chorost - 2006 - Medical - Limited preview
The author describes his experiences as he loses his hearing while in his thirties and then receives a computer chip implant that allows him to regain that sense, all the while exploring the ethical and philosophical implications of becoming ...
 

The Pain Chronicles: Cures, Myths, Mysteries, Prayers, Diaries, Brain Scans ...‎

The Pain Chronicles: Cures, Myths, Mysteries, Prayers, Diaries, Brain Scans ... Melanie Thernstrom - 2010 - Medical - Limited preview
Arguing that the American medical industry adheres to outdated pain-management practices that fail to bring effective relief to millions of patients, a history of pain management describes some of the colorful approaches of past cultures while ...
 

Fixing My Gaze: A Scientist's Journey Into Seeing in Three Dimensions‎

Fixing My Gaze: A Scientist's Journey Into Seeing in Three Dimensions Susan R. Barry, Oliver Sacks - 2010 - Medical - Limited preview
Provides the story of a woman who, after seeing the world in one way for her whole life, suddenly began to see things three dimensionally, examining the factors involved that affected such a change and challenging the notion that the brain is ...
 

Remembering smell‎

Remembering smell Limited preview
 

How Pleasure Works: The New Science of Why We Like What We Like‎

How Pleasure Works: The New Science of Why We Like What We Like Paul Bloom - 2010 - Psychology - Limited preview
The thought of sex with a virgin is intensely arousing for many men. The average American spends over four hours a day watching television. Abstract art can sell for millions of dollars. Young children enjoy playing with imaginary friends and can ...
 

Seeing Voices‎

Seeing Voices Oliver Sacks - 2009 - Language Arts & Disciplines - No preview available
 

The island of the colorblind: and, Cycad island‎

The island of the colorblind: and, Cycad island Oliver W. Sacks - 1998 - Medical - Snippet view
 

Blue Cats and Chartreuse Kittens: How Synesthetes Color Their Worlds‎

Blue Cats and Chartreuse Kittens: How Synesthetes Color Their Worlds Patricia Lynne Duffy - 2002 - No preview available
 

The Man Who Tasted Shapes‎

The Man Who Tasted Shapes Richard E. Cytowic, Jonathan Cole - 2008 - No preview available
 

 


 
Ariely, D. (2010). Predictably Irrational (revised edition). Harper Perennial.

So much has been written about this wonderful little book that is packed with examples of the tricks our mind plays on us when we believe we are making rational choices. 

 

Ariely, D. (2010). The Upside of Irrationality. 

In this new work, Dan Ariely points out some of the positive aspects of our irrationality. 

 

For a review of The Upside of Irrationality from the New York Times:  http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/06/books/review/Dunn-t.html
Check out the author's blog (http://danariely.com) for Irrationality IQ tests, excerpts from both books, and more.

 

Dan Ariely talks about Predictably Irrational, compliments of Ted.com

 http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/eng/dan_ariely_asks_are_we_in_control_of_our_own_decisions.html

 

 


Bloom, P. (2010). How Pleasure Works: The New Science of Why We Like What We Like. Norton.  I just picked this book up today so I can't comment on it, but it sure looks interesting and I happen to be a huge fan of Yale's Paul Bloom.  

 

From the publisher:  "Pleasure is anything but straightforward. Our desires, attractions, and tastes take us beyond the symmetry of a beautiful face, the sugar and fat in food, or the prettiness of a painting.  In How Pleasure Works, Yale University psychologist Paul Bloom draws on groundbreaking research to unveil the deeper workings of why we desire what we desire. Refuting the longstanding explanation of pleasure as a simple sensory response, Bloom shows us that pleasure is grounded in our beliefs about deeper nature or essence of a given thing. This is why we want the real Rolex and not the knockoff, the real Picasso and not the fake, the twin we have fallen in love with and not her identical sister.  

 

In this fascinating and witty account, Bloom draws on child development, philosophy, neuroscience, and behavioral economics in order to address pleasures noble and seamy, highbrow and lowbrow...."

 

Here is a review from the New York Times:  http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/27/books/review/Henig-t.html?scp=1&sq=%22How%20Pleasure%20Works%22&st=cse


 

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